By: Elizabeth Caudill, MSC 2015-2016

Each year elections take place on the local, state, and national level. As citizens of the United States, we have the privilege to vote on those who represent us in our city, county, state, nation, and of course the reigning heir to The Voice crown. Through all of the recent conversations surrounding the democratic process, one that is often accepted is: “Why should I even try to vote? It’s not like my vote counts anyways.” My vote doesn’t count. This is a hard and pessimistic view that leads to civic apathy, and hands all the power to those who choose to engage in the process.

Here are four numbers that show how “My Vote Doesn’t Count” is a load of bologna:

1.     5.63% - That’s less than the percentage of alcohol in Dallas’ own Deep Ellum IPA beer, yet it was the percentage of Dallas County that voted in the May 7th election. Out of 1,067,080 registered voters in Dallas County, a mere 60,117 votes were cast making the voter turnout 5.63%.

2.     42 – The number of votes that Dallas ISD Candidate Dustin Marshall won the District 2 trustee election in the June 18th runoff election. If everyone who ate at The Porch restaurant on Knox Henderson the night of Saturday June 18th decided to vote for the same candidate, they would have easily changed the outcome of the election.

3.     805,052 – The number of people in Dallas County who are over the age of 18, yet still not registered to vote or participating in government elections. Barriers such as voter registration requirements, education, and transportation to polling locations are some of the existing issues keeping people from being civically engaged.

4.     1 – The number of votes that you get in each and every election. A vote that may seem small and ‘doesn’t count,’ but when used with your fellow Dallas citizens holds a huge impact for the 2.5 million people living in Dallas County.  

Find out if you’re registered to vote or if your voter registration is up to date at www.dallascountyvotes.org . There you can also find information about upcoming elections, polling locations, and candidates. 

Each year elections take place on the local, state, and national level. As citizens of the United States, we have the privilege to vote on those who represent us in our city, county, state, nation, and of course the reigning heir to The Voice crown. Through all of the recent conversations surrounding the democratic process, one that is often accepted is: “Why should I even try to vote? It’s not like my vote counts anyways.” My vote doesn’t count. This is a hard and pessimistic view that leads to civic apathy, and hands all the power to those who choose to engage in the process.

Here are four numbers that show how “My Vote Doesn’t Count” is a load of bologna:

1.     5.63% - That’s less than the percentage of alcohol in Dallas’ own Deep Ellum IPA beer, yet it was the percentage of Dallas County that voted in the May 7th election. Out of 1,067,080 registered voters in Dallas County, a mere 60,117 votes were cast making the voter turnout 5.63%.

2.     42 – The number of votes that Dallas ISD Candidate Dustin Marshall won the District 2 trustee election in the June 18th runoff election. If everyone who ate at The Porch restaurant on Knox Henderson the night of Saturday June 18th decided to vote for the same candidate, they would have easily changed the outcome of the election.

3.     805,052 – The number of people in Dallas County who are over the age of 18, yet still not registered to vote or participating in government elections. Barriers such as voter registration requirements, education, and transportation to polling locations are some of the existing issues keeping people from being civically engaged.

4.     1 – The number of votes that you get in each and every election. A vote that may seem small and ‘doesn’t count,’ but when used with your fellow Dallas citizens holds a huge impact for the 2.5 million people living in Dallas County.  

Find out if you’re registered to vote or if your voter registration is up to date at www.dallascountyvotes.org. There you can also find information about upcoming elections, polling locations, and candidates. 

Comment